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"For Instruction shall come forth from Zion, The word of the L-rd from Jerusalem." -- Isaiah 2:3

Jerusalem

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LEVITICUS — 6:4 garments

It is desirable to go suitably dressed and especially when sitting down to a meal (Shabbat 114a. Spoken of the High Priest, who was not to appear in the Holy of Holies in vestments in which he prepared the sacrifices), a lesson derived by the School of Rabbi Yishmael from their explanation of "And he shall take off his garments and put it on others" [this verse]. Appearances are very important, and man was advised to spend more on dress than on food. Such advice was considered unnecessary for woman; nature has seen to that. "Woman's armour which she carries about with her, is her beauty", of mind, as well as of body, if we are to be chivalrous.
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LEVITICUS — 6:6 fire

Ten miracles were wrought for our forefathers in the sanctuary:… [5] the rains never put out the fire of the wood-pile [on the altar, under the open sky] Pirkei Avot, Perek V, mishnah 7. The altar for sacrifices was in an open space, exposed to the elements. Yet in the heaviest rains the fire always burned. If we might personify them, we could call fire and water natural mortal enemies: water poured on fire will douse it; if there is not enough water to put out a blaze, the flames will dry up the liquid rapidly. Yet here, for a higher purpose, these opposites were made to cooperate. The fire on the altar was needed that the offerings might be burnt there, in accordance with Scripture's revelation of the Divine will. In fact, it commanded, "a constant fire shall be kept burning up on the altar" [this verse]. The cohanim could ensure only a steady supply of wood, fed to the flames as necessary; rain was beyond their control. But Heaven intervened for its own command. To serve the higher goal of the Creator of all, fire and water rose above their natures and made a truce, as it were.… What natural elements did, human elements must also do. Clashing personalities, conflicting interests, drives and pulls in opposite directions -- in the communal life of Jewry these have no place. All must be subdued to the sacred will of Heaven, as we discern it through the Torah and its authentic teachers. Skulduggery of power and politics, the defeat of one group by another for the sheer joy of flexing and showing political muscle, the battle of wills as the greater pigheadedness seeks to triumph--all this is cold water to douse the fires of faith burning in the altars of the heart.
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LEVITICUS — 6:13 anointed

We must not do anything that might create animosity. The Talmud comments on the words, "When he is anointed" that only one High Priest at a time is anointed, not two. Why? Rabbi Yohanan explains that this is to prevent animosity. (Yerushalmi Yoma 1:1). The essence of the High Priest is the attribute of peace. Aharon, the first High Priest, was renowned as a lover and pursuer of peace. The High Priest must unite the entire nation. If there would be animosity in this high position, it would be a distortion and mockery of the concept of the High Priest. Therefore, nothing maybe done to create such animosity. (Yalkut Yehuda, on this verse).
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LEVITICUS — 6:18 place

Again and again our Torah emphasizes the dignity and respect that a man must accord his fellow. The Torah is considerate of human feelings even where you would least expect it. During the days of the Temple, for instance, various people brought offerings for different reasons. Some sacrifices were obligatory, some were gifts, and some were brought to atone for sin. In this last category were the hattah (sin–offering), brought for an unintentional transgression; the asham (guilt–offering), brought, for example, for the sin of swearing falsely; and the olah (burnt-offering), sometimes brought for improper thoughts, but it could be brought for other reasons as well, unrelated to sin. Now just imagine what might have happened at the Temple. The person making the offering had to be present, to place his hands on the animal of the sacrifice. Then, if Reuben walked into the Temple with his ashram, everyone would know that Reuben had sworn falsely! Let Simeon enter the Temple with his hattah, and all would realize that Simeon had sinned! Surely the Temple would have become a center of unwarranted public humiliation. Therefore the Torah specifically commands: "In the place where the olah is slaughtered shall the hattah be slaughtered" [this verse]; "In the place where they slaughter the olah shall they slaughter the asham" (Leviticus 7:2). Under this system the spectator would never know whether a particular sacrifice was a voluntary offering or something obligatory in expiation of a sin. This is how the Torah sought to protect the dignity and esteem of man. (Continued at Deuteronomy 20:5 "go back" SINAI1 301-2)
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LEVITICUS — 6:18 place

We must not cause someone embarrassment by referring to his past misdeeds. The Talmud (Yerushalmi Yevomos 8:3) explains that the reason the sin offering and burnt offering were slaughtered in the same place in the Sanctuary was to save sinners from embarrassment. Anyone witnessing someone bringing a sin offering could assume that it was a burnt offering which is brought as a donation and not necessarily as an atonement for a transgression. Using this as a source, the Sages made a regulation that prayer (shmoneh esrai) must be recited quietly in order not to embarrass people who confess their sins during their prayers. (Sotah 32b). This verse teaches us that we must be very careful not to cause someone embarrassment or discomfort because of past misdeeds.
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LEVITICUS — 6:18 spot

Respect and sensitivity to sinners also requires not embarrassing them needlessly. When G-d designed the Tabernacle (and later the Temple), He commanded Aaron to set up the place of the sin offering in the very same place as the burnt offering [this verse]. Why? The Talmud explains that if there was one particular place that the sin offering were to be offered, then all of the sinners would gather there and all would know that these are transgressors, causing a very embarrassing situation. In order to avoid this, G-d demonstrated great sensitivity, and commanded the sin offering and burnt offering to be brought from the same spot so that no one would be able to distinguish between these two groups of Jews (Sotah 32b).
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LEVITICUS — 6:18 spot

Since th[e] mitzvah [of preserving dignity] is truly important, it will be shown that both the Torah and the rabbis went to great lengths to preserve a person's dignity. The Talmud (Berachot 19b) says that preserving dignity is so important that one may violate a negative mitzvah for the sake of preserving dignity. Later authorities rule that a person may violate any rabbinic (not biblical) injunction in order to preserve dignity (Maimonides, Hilchot Kelayim 10:29). Since most of Jewish practice is rabbinic, not biblical in nature, most practices in Judaism can be violated if doing the mitzvah would necessitate violating a person's dignity. ... The Torah in itself shows its sensitivity to the concept of not embarrassing anyone. [This] verse says that the place to which the burnt offering is brought should be the same place the sin offering "for accidental sins" is brought. The Talmud (Sotah 32b) explains that the Torah was trying to protect the identity of those who brought a sin offering, so that no one could tell by looking at a particular place in the Temple if the people were sinners or not. When the offering of the First Fruits (Bikurim) was brought to the Temple, a number of verses had to be read with the offering. Since not everyone could read, the rabbis (Mishnah, Bikurim 3:7) instituted a rule that there should be permanent readers to read for everyone. It would not suffice merely to have readers for those who could not read since their illiteracy would be obvious. By having a permanent reader, no one would know who could and who could not read, avoiding embarrassment. This is the practice adopted today in most Ashkenazic synagogues for Torah reading. Since most Ashkenazic people today cannot read the Torah with the proper melody, a Torah reader reads for everyone, even those who can read, in order to avoid embarrassment. In the same way, it was the custom to bring food to a shiva house (house of Jewish morning). However, the poor use to bring in plain baskets while the rich brought in wealthier baskets, which caused embarrassment to the poor. Therefore, the rabbis (Mo'ed Katan 27a) instituted a custom everyone had to bring food in a plain basket to the house of mourning.
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LEVITICUS — 7:2 holy

One of the Torah's 613 commandments is "You shall be holy" [this verse]. In Nachmanides' Torah commentary, he explains that, to achieve holiness, it is not enough to refrain from doing unholy and wrongful acts, although that indeed is a necessary first stage (we can't be holy while stealing, deceiving others, or engaging in a forbidden sexual relationship). But the second stage, to which all people should aspire, is "to sanctify yourself through that which is permitted to you" (Yevamot 20a). Thus, if we eat permitted food but "eat like a pig," we have not violated Judaism's dietary restrictions, but we have violated the command to "be holy." Similarly, if we refrain from speaking words that could console or inspire another, we have not done anything directly immoral, but we certainly have not obeyed the injunction to "be holy." To achieve holiness, we must strive to do what is permitted--whether it involves eating, speaking to others, or conducting our business--in a way that is holy. Therefore, in any given circumstance in which we are uncertain how to behave, we should ask ourselves, "What would the command to 'be holy' bid me to you do in this situation?"
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