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"For Instruction shall come forth from Zion, The word of the L-rd from Jerusalem." -- Isaiah 2:3

Jerusalem

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GENESIS — 1:27 likeness

It is a mitzvah for every Jew to love every fellow Jew as he loves himself, as the Torah states [Leviticus 19:18], You shall love your fellow as yourselfRambam, Hilchos Dei’os 6:3  Rabbi Akiva taught that this is the principle upon which the mitzvos of the Torah are based. Ben Azzai elaborated, quoting the verse regarding the creation of man [this verse], in the likeness of Hashem he was created. Thus, when we view another person we are viewing the likeness of the Creator. The Jewish people, who committed themselves to enter a permanent covenant with Hashem to follow His ways, are considered children of Hashem.  This is how we must perceive every other Jew. Furthermore, since we all have one “Father,” we are all “related,” which breeds natural closeness and feelings of affinity. Toras Kohamim, Parshas Kedoshim 4:12; Raavad, Rabbeinu Hillel (cf. Rashi, Shabbas 31a, s.v. de’aluch). See also Avos D’Rabbi Nosson 16:5, Devarim 14:1. EHRMAN 3
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GENESIS — 2:4 created

A doctor is obligated to heal the sick to the best of his abilities. Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh Deah 336:1  One may ask, “Since healing is in the hands of Hashem, why does the doctor have an obligation to heal?” Hashem created a world of “cause and effect” directed by Him alone. [this verse]  This reality gives a human being the most basic aspect of his humanity: free will. Because a person eats, he feels satiated; therefore, he can choose to do the mitzvah of feeding the hungry. Because he has money he can buy food and clothing; therefore, he can choose to give tzedakah to the poor and alleviate their plight. A disease is cured by a certain medication; therefore, a doctor can prescribe it and perform the mitzvah of healing the sick. This is the purpose of creation: to choose that which is right and to avoid wrong. Deuteronomy 30:15 Thus, the world of “cause and effect” is the framework within which a person can operate his “free will.” If a person wrongly exercise free will by recklessly exposing himself to disease or danger, he violates the basic injunction to guard his life and health which were Divinely bestowed to accomplish his life’s tasks. He then deserves the effect of illness or accident that he chose to bring upon himself. Talmud, Ketubos 30a However, Hashem may decide to bring illness even on a person who acted very responsibly, and directs the cause and effect toward that end. If Hashem wants a person to be fed, He will cause him to meet his kindly benefactor Similarly, if Hashem wants an ill person to recover, He will cause him to meet the doctor who will heal him However, if Hashem does not wish the person to be healed, He will direct “cause and effect” that way. Thus, Hashem alone directs “cause and effect.” Our task in life is to exercise free will. A doctor can choose to treat a patient, exercising his free will for “right”; he has chosen to fulfill Hashem’s mitzvah of returning a person to life and health. Yoreh Deah ibid. If he chooses “wrong,” and does not treat the patient, his negligence is considered tantamount to murder. Talmud, Nedarim 40a  JOURNEY 520-1
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GENESIS — 2:22 brought

It is a mitzvah to bring joy to a chasan (groom) and kallah (bride) at their wedding. Talmud, Berachos 6b; Kesubos 17aWhen Hashem created Adam and Chavah in the Garden of Eden, He brought Chavah to Adam with joy, so that they should rejoice with each other. [this verse, Berachot 61a] This is an obligatory mitzvah of kindness. One may interrupt one’s Torah study in order to bring rejoicing to a couple. Kesubot 17a. When a wedding procession passed, Rabbi Yehudah would interrupt his Torah studies and go with his students to dance for the bride and bring the couple joy.  JOURNEY 533
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GENESIS — 7:8 not

The Sages pointed out that in several places the Torah speaks in a long-winded fashion in order to each us to use refined speech. In telling the story of the flood, the Torah speaks of certain animals as being “not clean” rather than tamei [this verse] to each us never to unnecessarily speak in a slighting manner – even of an unclean animal. JOURNEY 152
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GENESIS — 18:1 appeared

Whenever the prophets described Hashem’s “character traits,” such as slow to anger, abundant in kindness, righteous, truthful, straightforward, strong, etc., their intention was to teach us the qualities we should embody in our conduct in order to emulate Hashem, to the extent that our limited abilities allow.   Rambam, Hilchot Dei’os 1:6 … If a person visits or heals a sick person, he should think, “I am emulating Hashem Who heals the sick and visits them” (cf. this verse]. EHRMAN 13
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GENESIS — 18:1 appeared

Whenever the prophets described Hashem’s “character traits,” such as slow to anger, abundant in kindness, righteous, truthful, straightforward, strong, etc., their intention was to teach us the qualities we should embody in our conduct in order to emulate Hashem, to the extent that our limited abilities allow. Ramban, Hilchos Dei’os 1:6, Chofetz Chaim, Introduction, Positive Commandment 6.  … If a person visits or heals a sick person, he should think, “I am emulating Hashem Who heals the sick and visits them.” [cf. this verse]   Sarah Genesis 18:1-14 and the Shunamis II Kings 4:8-17, both childless, were rewarded with children because of this mitzvah. Tanchuma, Parshas Ki Seitzei. JOURNEY 13
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GENESIS — 18:3 past

The sages extolled the mitzvah of hospitality. “Extending hospitality to wayfarers is greater even than receiving the Divine Presence, as we see from Avraham who interrupted his conversation with Hashem and ran after three passersby, begging them to accept his hospitality” [this verse]. Shabbos 127a; see also Ahavas Chesed Part 3, Ch. 1, for discussion of the importance of this mitzvah and sources. EHRMAN 508
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GENESIS — 18:13 old

In certain situations the Sages allowed an altering of the truth … For example, it is permitted, and indeed a mitzvah, to alter the truth to bring peace between two parties in a dispute, or between quarreling spouses. We find that even Hashem altered the truth in order to bring peace into a marriage. Rashi, Bereishis 18:13, and Talmud, Yevamos 65b.  The Sages also encourage us to follow the example of Aharon. When Aharon the Kohen would see that two people were fighting he would go to one sit with him, and say, “Your friend feels so bad, he is so embarrassed because he feels he is at fault …,” and would stay with him until his feelings of animosity would completely dissipate. Then Aharon would go to the antagonist and sit with him and say, “Your friend feels so bad, he is so embarrassed because he feels his is at fault…,” and would stay with him until his animosity would completely dissipate. Then the two would meet on the street and they would embrace. Pirkei Avos 1;12, Avos D’Rabbi Nosson 12:3 JOURNEY 94-5
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GENESIS — 18:13 old

One should not repeat what one person said about another if he spoke in even slightly insulting terms. Chofetz Chaim, Hilchos Rechilus 8:4 In Parshas Vayeira Sarah said: “How can I have children and my husband is an old man?” Hashem repeated her words to Avraham in the following way: Sarah said, “How can I have children and I am old?” Hashem changed her version because a husband could be sensitive to being referred to as an old man, even though only slight feelings of hurt are involved. [this verse] JOURNEY 164
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GENESIS — 18:19 just

… there are times when it is a mitzvah to hate. One might ask, “How is this congruent with the Torah personality of love and kindness?”   Every human being is endowed with a Divine spark that inspires him to love kindness, truth and justice.   At the same time, there is an inner drive pushing him to be selfish and to single-mindedly fulfill all his desires and goals with a total disregard both for other people and for these positive values of human interaction. Most people waver between these two drives, sometimes following one, sometimes the other, and usually applying a combination of both. Simultaneously, every person has natural tendencies toward love and hatred – love for those people or ideas for which he has an affinity, and hatred as a reaction to his feelings of aversion for others. The legacy of our forefather Avraham, and the prime teaching of the Torah, is that a person develop his Divine spark, which will lead him to follow the way of kindness and justice [this verse]. He must also strive to overcome, as much as possible, the trait of selfishness, which leads to all the vices of the world. As a person develops this Divine spark within himself, he will feel an affinity to those qualities and an aversion to vice. Shaarei Teshuvah 3:190  The prime method of developing this Divine spark and an ultimate appreciation of Torah, kindness and justice is to recognize the manifold infinite kindnesses of Hashem. Every person must contemplate that his very creation is due to the sheer kindness of Hashem, Who constantly showers him with life, sustenance and an infinite number of seemingly natural miracles. The enormity of the precise workings of the human organism, as well as animals, plants, etc. multiplied by billions, will overwhelm any thinking individual as to the majesty and kindness of the Creator. EHRMAN 35-6
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