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"For Instruction shall come forth from Zion, The word of the L-rd from Jerusalem." -- Isaiah 2:3

Jerusalem

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GENESIS — 37:1 settled

There is no Jewish concept of retiring from Judaism. … The classic story about a Jew who wished to “retire” was Jacob in the Bible.   After experiencing all the turmoil of fighting with his brother, running away, working for twenty years, and having a family, the Torah says that Jacob dwelled in the land of his fathers [this verse].   Rashi comments [on Genesis 37:2] that Jacob wished to rest peacefully for the remainder of his life. G-d said that this is not the lot of the righteous [“When the righteous wish to live at ease, the Holy one, blessed be He), says to them: “Are not the righteous satisfied with what is stored up for them in the world to come that they wish to live at ease in this world too! Genesis Rabbah 84:3], and subsequently the entire episode of Joseph and the brothers transpired, causing great anguish for twenty-two years until the family was reunited after relocating to Egypt.   It seems that the Torah does not want Jacob or any other Jew to simply “retire,” whether it be from Judaism, from work, or from life itself.  AMEMEI 83
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GENESIS — 37:2 reports

Lashon hara was the main reason that Bnei Yisrael descended to Egypt, as the pasuk says [this verse].  Because of Yosef’s words, it was decreed in Heaven that he should be sold as a slave, which was a measure-for-measure punishment for his having said that his brothers called some of their brothers slaves, as the Midrash Genesis Rabbah 84:7 and the Yerushalmi [Jerusalem Talmud] in Peah 1:1.   Even though Yosef thought he had a reason that halachically justified relating this information, as the commentaries, explain, you see that no justification helped him, and he was punished nonetheless.  SEFER 31
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GENESIS — 37:2 reports

A child is forbidden to tell his parents derogatory information about his brothers and sisters before he himself has admonished them.   The Chofetz Chayim notes that Yosef did not relate derogatory information about his brothers to anyone else besides their father.   Furthermore, his intentions were constructive and not malicious.  Nevertheless, Yosef’s report was improper, since he should have admonished his brothers and tried to correct their apparent misdeeds before speaking to his father about them.  Had he reproved his brothers, they would have been able to show him that he was mistaken (see Sifsai Chachomim).  Because he failed to go directly to them first, Yosef was punished (Rashi).   Shmiras Haloshon 2:11).   PLYN 109
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GENESIS — 37:2 reports

Even if the speaker’s intentions are entirely good, he must take care [to tell the truth]. Chofetz Chaim, Hilchos Lashon Hara 10-2. … Any statements he makes must be strictly true, and contain no element of exaggeration.   Furthermore, if the subject is alleged to have violated the Torah, the speaker must be certain that his understanding of the relevant halachos is accurate and that he is applying them correctly to the case at hand.   Often, the right or wrong status of an action depends on many intricate details, and an individual who makes a quick judgment based on superficial or secondhand knowledge of the facts is likely to err. Therefore, it is important both to investigate all the circumstances thoroughly and to consult with a qualified rav regarding any halachic considerations. In Parshas Vayeishev Yosef misjudged his brothers’ actions and concluded incorrectly that they were guilty of certain sins. He was guilty of lashon hara for relating this information to this father Bereishis 37:2. EHRMAN 197-8
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GENESIS — 37:2 reports

Know that once the listener accepts lashon hara, the law for him and the portion [of punishment] meted out to him Esther 4:11, Jeremiah 13:25 is equal to that of the one who spoke the lashon hara, for people will say, “Those who heard his words accepted them. This proves that they are true and accurate.”   Even if the listener [merely] bends his ear and shows that he is attentive and accepting of these words in the presence of others, this also abets the evil, causes the disgrace of his fellowman, and strengthens the hands of the one who brings his negative reports (Lit. evil gossip) to others.  GATES 411 (Continued at Numbers 30:3 violate GATES 411)
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GENESIS — 37:2 reports

We should be particularly careful not to speak ill of family member.   [This verse] is the first of several details the Torah provides bout Joseph’s relationship with is brothers, who soon came to hate him.   The most obvious lesson is that parents should discourage their children from informing on each other. It is good for a child to report if he or she is being bullied or otherwise taken advantage of.   But the verse implies that Joseph was steadily bringing back negative reports about his brothers’ actions, something that should not be done unless the misbehavior is extreme.   … Because of thoughtless remarks, family members become categorized as “the selfish one,” “the fool,” the bad-tempered one,” or “the incompetent.”  … Lashon hara is often responsible for the common phenomenon of close relatives who are not on speaking terms.  In many instances, these family feuds start with hurtful comments one relative makes about another.  Almost invariably, the objects of the complaints eventually hear about the gossip, and from that point on the antagonism escalates.   TELVOL1:336
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GENESIS — 37:2 reports

You are forbidden to relate loshon hora to someone about his parents, brothers, sisters, children, or any other relative.   Even if your sole intention is relating the derogatory information is that the listener reprimand his relative, it is forbidden.   If, however, you have already rebuked the person yourself and your efforts to correct him have failed, or if you are unable to rebuke him yourself, this restriction would not apply.   … Yosef related derogatory information about his brothers to their father Yaakov in order that Yaakov should admonish them [this verse]. Nevertheless, Yosef was punished.   Before he spoke to his father about his brothers, he should have admonished them himself.  GUARD 105
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GENESIS — 37:3 coat

R. Chama b. Guria sad in the name of Rav: “One should never show favoritism to one son above the other, for because of the additional expenditure of the weight of two coins of fine wool for the many-colored coat that Jacob made for Joseph, beyond what he spent for his other sons, his brothers envied him, and the end result was that our forefathers went down to Egypt” Shabbat 10b TEMIMAH-GEN 154
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GENESIS — 37:3 loved

Parents must be careful not to favor one child over the other.   The Talmud comments on [this verse] that parents must never favor one child over anther.   Because of the many-colored coat which Yaakov gave to Yosef and not to any of this other sons, Yosef’s brothers became jealous.   The eventual outcome as that our forefathers went down to Egypt and were enslaved. (Shabbat 10b, see Tosfos).   Parents must always be on the alert that their actions or words should not create jealousy.  The consequences of jealousy among brothers and sisters can be tragic, and we must be careful to avoid doing anything that will breed it.   Statements such as, “Why don’t you study with the diligence of your brother?” or “Why aren’t you as well-behaved as your sister?” are bound to cause ill feelings.  Some parents might think that their children love and respect one another to such an extent that they are incapable of feeling jealously towards each other.   However, just because a child does not overtly show envy, does not mean that envy is not present.   PLYN 110
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